Appling Grays

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Appling County Roll of Honor

Appling Grays Company I, 27th GA

Appling Rangers Company F, 47th GA

Appling Volunteers Company B & Satilla Rifles Company K, 54th GA

Clinch's 4th Cavalry

 

 


Appling County Roll of Honor

 

The following is a list of Appling County Infantrymen that died during the War Between the States.  The list is compiled from the “Rosters of Confederate Soldiers of Georgia" – Lillian Henderson

 

This is a memorial to all those Appling County citizens that gave the ultimate sacrifice – their lives!

Company F, 47th Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry “Appling Rangers” (Company F 11th Battalion)

 

John M. Sellers - Died of disease in Cassville, Georgia Oct. 18, 1863

William Sellers - Died of disease Date unknown

Austin W. Blount - Died of disease June 25, 1862

Benjamin F. Bullard - Died of disease in Atlanta, Georgia Oct. 20, 1863

Wesley P. Bullard - Died of disease May 19, 1863

Thomas Crapps - Died of disease in Savannah, Georgia Oct. 8, 1862

Samuel Deen - Killed in action at Johns Island, South Carolina July 10, 1864

Martin M. Deen - Killed in action at Johns Island, South Carolina July 10, 1864

John E. Googe - Killed in action at Johns Island, South Carolina July 10, 1864

John Green - Killed in action at Johns Island, South Carolina July 10, 1864

Thomas J. Hall - Killed in action at Honey Hill, South Carolina Nov. 30, 1864

Philip Herndon - Died of disease at Camp Williams, Georgia Aug 16, 1864

David Hester or Hesters - Died of disease at Rock Island, Ill. Prison Dec. 20, 1863

James Holton - Died of disease at Altamaha Bridge, Georgia Nov. 10, 1862

Archibald Johnson - Died of disease in Savannah, Georgia Nov. 30, 1864

John W. Johnson - Killed in action at Morris Island, South Carolina 1864

Richard G. Long - Killed in action at Chickamauga, Georgia Sept. 19, 1864 (Transferred to Co. “A” 1st Battalion)

Watson Leggett - Died of disease in Savannah, Georgia Nov. 1, 1863

Archibald McClelland - Died of disease in Greensboro, Georgia May 23, 1864

Willis Miles - Died of disease in South Carolina Date unknown

Rueben C. Nail - Died of unknown causes April 19, 1862

William Ray - Died of disease in Atlanta, Georgia Oct. 17, 1863

George Rentz - Died of unknown causes in Macon, Georgia 1863 or 1864

Clinton Sapp - Wounded at Honey Hill, South Carolina Nov. 30, 1864 Died of wounds in Savannah, Georgia Jan. 18, 1865

Elijah Sapp - Died of disease at Camp Williams, Georgia Aug. 3, 1862

Thomas W. Shumans - Captured Nov. 25, 1864 at Missionary Ridge, Tenn. Died of disease at Rock Island, Ill. Prison Dec. 27, 1863

Dennis Smith - Wounded at Honey Hill, South Carolina. Nov. 30, 1864 Died of wounds in Charleston, S.C. Dec. 18, 1864

George W. Spell - Died of disease in Richmond, Virginia June 14, 1862

Asberry R. Taylor - Died of disease in Lauderdale Springs, Mississippi Sept. 24, 1863

Benjamin Taylor - Killed in action at Bentonville, N.C. April 18, 1865

Berry S. Taylor - Died of disease in Thomaston, Georgia Aug. 6, 1864

Elisha Taylor - Killed in action at Bentonville, N.C. April 18, 1865

Jesse S. Taylor - Died of disease in Atlanta, Georgia Nov. 8, 1863

Aaron B. Varn - Died of disease in Atlanta, Georgia  Dec. 14, 1863

Daniel R. Varn - Died of disease Nov. 1, 1862

William G. Wiley - Died of unknown causes Dec. 12, 1863

John Williams - Wounded at James Island, South Carolina June 10, 1862 Died of wounds in Baxley, Georgia Nov. 10, 1862

Ellis Woodson - Wounded and captured at Savannah, Georgia Dec. 22, 1864 Died of Wounds Jan. 9, 1865

David Yawn - Died of disease 1862

Calvin Yawn - Died of unknown causes in Savannah, Georgia June 2, 1863

 

Company B, 54th Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry – “Appling Volunteers”

Lafayette Philips - Died of unknown causes May 15, 1862

Abraham Eason - Died of disease Feb. 23, 1864

William H. Eason - Died of injury in Savannah, Georgia Oct. 6, 1862

Stephen Carter - Died of disease in Savannah, Georgia  Sept. 22, 1863

William Hughes - Died of disease in Atlanta, Georgia  July 25, 1864

George W. Middleton - Died of disease in Atlanta, Georgia  Jan. 6, 1864

Middleton Miles - Killed in action at Kennesaw Mt., Georgia  June 27, 1864

James L. Moody - Died of unknown causes June 16, 1862

Isham Strickland - Died of disease at Camp Chase Prision in Ohio Feb 14, 1865

Arthur Turner - Died of disease in Richmond, Virginia Oct. 1, 1864

 

Company K, 54th Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry – “Satilla Rifles”

J. T. Mann - Killed in action at Vining Station, Georgia  July 4, 1864

Henry Bennett - Died of disease in Savannah, Georgia Dec. 22 1863 or 1864

John W. Bennett - Died of disease in Atlanta, Georgia May 28, 1864

W. H. Cooper - Died of unknown causes in Richmond, Virginia Nov. 16, 1864

Elijah Dickson - Died of unknown causes Aug. 16, 1863

John Dickson - Killed in action at Jonesboro, Georgia Aug. 31, 1864

Joel C. Griffis - Killed in Action at Atlanta, Georgia July 22, 1864

E. S. Knight - Killed in action at Atlanta, Georgia  July 22, 1864

I.R. Knight - Killed in action at Atlanta, Georgia  July 22, 1864

H.B. Lynn - Died of unknown causes in Savannah, Georgia  Sept. 20, 1862

William Moody - Killed in action at Chickamauga, Georgia  Sept. 19, 1863 (Had transferred to Company “C”, 1st Battalion)

Jasper Patterson - Died of unknown causes at James Island, South Carolina 1863

H. P. Roberson - Died of disease, 1864

W. H. Roberson - Died of disease, 1864

 

Company I 27th Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, “Appling Grays”

Elisha Aldridge - Died of disease in Richmond, Virginia July 11, 1862

Jackson Cooner - Killed in action at Seven Pines, Virginia May 31, 1862

Jefferson Cooner - Died of disease at Camp Pickens, Virginia Feb. 8, 1862

John Cooner - Killed in action at Ocean Pond, Florida Feb. 20, 1864

Thomas Howell Courson - Died of disease in Richmond, Virginia May 15, 1862

Joseph A. Crapps - Killed in action at Bentonville, North Carolina March 19, 1865

Isham Crosby - Died of disease at Manassas, Virginia Dec. 3, 1861

Jacob Crosby - Died of disease at Richmond, Virginia April 20, 1862

William Custer or Kutler - Died at Camp Douglas, Illinois Prison Date Unknown

James E. Davis - Died at Richmond, Virginia of unknown causes June 5, 1862

John J. Dilbon - Died at Yorktown, Virginia of unknown causes May 22, 1862

C. M. Douglas - Died of unknown causes at Charleston, South Carolina Jan. 18, 1864

William Eason - Died of unknown causes at Richmond, Virginia  Dec. 21, 1861

J. Fields - Died of unknown causes at Richmond, Virginia  May 14, 1862

D. C. Hagan or Hagin - Died of unknown causes at Richmond, Virginia  May, 1863

Alfred S. Hall - Died of unknown causes April 1, 1863

David Jack Hester or J. D. Hesters - Died of unknown causes at Richmond, Virginia  Nov. 22, 1861

David Hester or Hesters - Captured at Missionary Ridge, Tennessee Nov. 25, 1863 Died of disease at Rock Island, Illinois Prison Dec. 20, 1863

Francis M. Hester or Hesters - Killed in action at Sharpsburg, Maryland Sept. 17, 1862

John Hughes - Died of disease at Raleigh, North Carolina Nov. 21, 1861

Benjamin F. Hutto - Died of disease in Richmond, Virginia  Sept. 5, 1864


Alexander W. Johnson - Killed in action at Sharpsburg, Maryland Sept. 17, 1862

Levi Johnson - Killed in action at Sharpsburg, Maryland Sept. 17, 1862

Frank Jones - Died of unknown causes at Richmond, Virginia Feb. 1862

Joseph Jones - Died of unknown causes at Raleigh, North Carolina Dec. 1861

Peter Kemp - Died of disease at Richmond, Virginia  Aug. 1, 1862


Osgood A. Lee - Killed in action at Seven Pines, Virginia  May 31, 1862

Adolph Lessure - Killed in action at Sharpsburg, Maryland Sept. 17, 1862

D. M. Livingston - wounded at Petersburg, Virginia  June 20, 1864 Died of wounds in Richmond, VA June 27, 1864

Patrick Lynn - Died of disease at Manassas, Virginia  Nov. 2, 1861

William Lynn - Died of unknown causes in Virginia  Apr. 1862

William Martin - Died of disease at Raleigh, North Carolina Nov. 12, 1861

James McGauley or McGalley - Killed in action at Cold Harbor, Virginia  June 27, 1862

William H. Nelson - Killed in action at Petersburg, Virginia  1864

G. W. L. Nix - Died of disease at Manassas, Virginia  Dec. 26, 1861

Daniel J. Philips - Died of unknown causes at Charleston, South Carolina Jan. 8, 1864

Franklin Quinn - Killed in action at Seven Pines, Virginia May 31, 1862

Jacob Rentz - Died of disease at Richmond, Virginia . Nov. 25, 1861

Buford Sapp - Killed in action at Weldon Railroad, Virginia  Aug. 18, 1864

William Smith - Killed in action at Seven Pines, Virginia  May 31, 1862

William Storey - Killed in action at Petersburg, Virginia  June 9, 1864

Jacob T. Thompson - Killed in action at Seven Pines, Virginia  May 31, 1862

Moses Tomberlin - Died of disease at Culpepper, Virginia  Nov. 25, 1861

David J. Tuten - Died of disease at Richmond, Virginia  Nov. 27, 1861

George Vanes - Killed in action at The Wilderness, Virginia May 6, 1864


CO. B & CO. K, 54th GEORGIA INFANTRY

Co. B and Co.. K (the Satilla Rifles) were formed and became a part of the 1st Brigade, Georgia State Troops in October 1861. Co. B was originally designated as Co. K, 2nd Regiment and the Satilla Rifles were designated as Co. A, 1st Regiment. In April of 1862 both companies were mustered out of the Georgia State Troops and became part of the newly formed 54th Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry.


Company B elected George W. Moody as Captain, Lafayette N. Phillips - 1st Lieutenant, James L. Moody - 2nd Lieutenant and John Jackson Roberson - Jr. 2nd Lieutenant. Company K elected George W. Eason as Captain, James H. Hannon - 1st Lieutenant, Richard Bennett - 2nd Lieutenant and Green B. Ritch - Jr. 2nd Lieutenant.


The 54th Georgia was deployed in the coastal defense around the Savannah - Charleston area. They were involved in numerous conflicts in that area including the siege of Battery Wagner on Morris Island, South Carolina. In 1864 the 54th Georgia became a part of Mercer's Brigade and was reassigned to the Army of Tennessee in Dalton Georgia as Sherman was beginning his campaign in Georgia. They were engaged at Dalton, Rocky Face, Resaca, Adairsville, Cassville, New Hope Church, Kennesaw Mountain, Peachtree Creek, the battle of Atlanta and the battle of Jonesboro. Under General John B. Hood, the 54th left Georgia to engage in the Tennessee Campaign. They were engaged at Franklin, Tennessee. They were deployed to Mississippi and finally back to North Carolina where they were reunited with General Joseph E. Johnston's troops and fought in the battle of Bentonville.

William A. Bowers, Jr. - 1997


CO F, 47th GEORGIA INFANTRY
(11th BATTALION)
"APPLING RANGERS"

The "Appling Rangers were formed March 4, 1862 as Company F, 11th Battalion, Georgia Volunteer Infantry. On May 12, 1862 the 11th Battalion was merged into the 47th Georgia Volunteer Infantry. James H. Latimer was elected as Captain of the Company on March 4, 1862. When he resigned on October 26, 1863 he was replaced as Captain by Joseph G. Dedge.
Originally deployed in the Charleston, South Carolina area they were engaged on James Island, Morris Island and Proctor's Point in South Carolina and were then assigned in Savannah in late 1862. In the Spring of 1863 the 47th Georgia was transferred to Mississippi and participated in the siege of Jackson, Mississippi and were engaged in Marion, Mississippi. In the summer of 1863 the "Rangers" were assigned to General Stovall's and J. T. Jackson's Brigades with the Army of Tennessee. They fought with the Army of Tennessee at Chickamauga, Chattanooga Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. They participated in the Atlanta Campaign and were engaged at Dalton, Resaca, Oostanaula, Cassville, New Hope Church, Kennesaw Mountain, Peachtree Creek and Atlanta.


The 47th Regiment was then employed in the defense of Charleston. The Appling Rangers were active in fights at, James Island, Johns Island, Coosawatchie, Waynesboro and Honey Hill. The 47th Georgia was then transferred to G. P. Harrison's command and participated in the Defense of Savannah. When Hardee pulled out from Savannah, the Appling Rangers were consolidated with the 46th Georgia and Bonaud's Battalion under General Johnston and were involved in the Campaign in South Carolina and North Carolina. They were in battles at Tulafinny, Rivers Bridge, Pocataligo, Averysboro, Sautee, Bentonville and Greensboro. On April 26, 1865 they surrendered with General Joseph E. Johnston at Goldsboro, North Carolina.

William A. Bowers, Jr. - 1997


A Brief History of Company I, 27th Georgia Volunteer Infantry

The Appling Grays were organized on July 6, 1861 as a volunteer company at Holmesville, Georgia. The first officers were Captain Osgood A. Lee, 1st lieutenant Alfred S. Hall, 2nd lieutenant Lawrence W. Clay and 2nd lieutenant Dr. Zedekiah W. Little.

The Appling Grays practiced their drills in preparation for being sent into war at an old camp meeting ground known as Campground. It was located near Bishop Creek about three miles South of the present town of Graham. It has been told that they were so anxious to go into action that instead of waiting to be supplied with uniforms by the government that they hired a tailor to come and cut out the uniforms and the wives, sisters and sweethearts sewed their uniforms while they drilled.

The company departed Appling County on August 27, 1861 for instruction at Camp Stevens in Griffin, Georgia. There it was organized as Company "I" of the 27th Regiment in the Georgia Volunteer Infantry. This Regiment was composed of men from Henry, Pike, Bibb, Jackson, Taylor, Talbot, Appling, Quitman and Clay counties. It shipped out to Richmond Virginia in October of 1861 and totaled 428 men in 1862. It was assigned to General Winfield Scott Featherston's Brigade. It was later commanded by General Gabriel Rains, and after September 1, 1862 by General Alfred Holt Colquitt and was part of Colquitt's Brigade along with the 6th Georgia. The regiment was in D. H. Hill's division and later in Jackson's corps.

The regiment was prominent on many battlefields in the Virginia theater as a part of the Army of Northern Virginia. It was engaged in battles at Yorktown, Williamsburg, and Seven Pines (Fair Oaks). At Seven Pines the Grays distinguished themselves in action and were part of the two regiments that overran the enemy lines thus forcing them to retreat in defeat. In this action the Grays' Captain Osgood A. Lee was killed while leading his company. Elisha Duncan Graham was elected Captain in his place. They were at Mechanicsville, Beaver Dam Creek, Gaines Mill, Cold Harbor, Chickahominy, Glendale, Frazier's Farm, Charles City Cross Roads, New Market Cross Roads, Willis Church, White Oak Swamp and Malvern Hill in the Seven Days battle around Richmond. They also fought in Maryland in September 1862. They helped hold Turner's Gap at the battle of South Mountain. Three days later they were in the thick of the battle at Sharpsburg (Antietum), where they were in the "cornfield", at Hagerstown Pike and helped to hold out on Hill's left flank at "Bloody Lane". The Grays were lightly engaged at Fredericksburg in December, 1862 The 27th had been in D. H. Hill's Division until he was reassigned to North Carolina in May of 1863 when they became part of Robert Rhodes' Division. In May of 1863 Colquitt's Brigade was in the Battle of Chancellorsville where it sustained 31 causalities. As a unit of Jackson's Corps, Colquitt's Brigade took the lead in the great flank march that surprised and routed half of Hooker's Army. Very Shortly after that battle, Lee transferred the depleted Brigade to Hill in North Carolina. They served in defense of the Georgia, Florida and Carolina coast including being stationed on the beach in front of Battery Wagner after the assault on by Union forces. The Appling Grays and the 27th Georgia were instrumental in the Confederate Victory at the Battle of Olustee (Ocean Pond), Florida February 20, 1864.

The 27th Georgia returned to Virginia for the 1864 Spring campaign with General Lee. They fought in the following battles: Drewry's Bluff, Spotsylvania, 2nd Cold Harbor. During the siege of Petersburg the Appling Grays helped to hold Colquitt's Salient and were at the battle of the Crater. They were involved in holding Richmond in late 1864 and were active in the battles at Weldon Railroad and Fort Harrison.

They Grays were then in battles at Fort Fisher, Wilmington, Kinston, Averysboro and Sugarloaf in North Carolina. In 1865 the 27th Georgia fought under General Joseph E. Johnston and the Army of Tennessee at Bentonville in North Carolina and surrendered with him at Greensboro, North Carolina on April 26, 1865

CLINCH'S 4TH GEORGIA CAVALRY

The 4th Georgia Cavalry Regiment was formed in January 1863 with the 3rd Georgia Cavalry Battalion as it's foundation. The 3rd Cavalry Battalion consisted of six companies The men that served in were from Appling, Camden, Charlton, Clinch, Coffee, Glynn, Pierce, Wayne and Ware counties. The commanders of the regiment were Colonel Duncan L. Clinch, Lt. Colonel John L. Harris and Major Jesse C. McDonald. The primary duty of the regiment was the defense of the Georgia coast from the Altamaha river south to the St. Marys river. In February 1864 Clinch's cavalry was sent to Olustee Station, Florida along with Colquitt's Brigade and the Chatham Artillery to assist in the defense of that area.. They were engaged in the battles at Olustee and Cedar Creek in northern Florida. In the summer of 1864 the regiment was assigned to M. W. Hannon's command and skirmished in Alabama, North Georgia and were later active in the defense of Savannah and in the Carolina campaign. in Dece mber 1864 a company of dismounted 4th Cavalry was involved in the "Battle of the Trestle" (the "Battle of Doctortown" near the Appling-Wayne County line. Clinch's 4th Cavalry which included 200 officers and men surrendered with the Army of Tennessee in March 1865.

Records are sketchy on the Georgia Cavalry units therefore making it difficult to reconstruct the regiment's rosters. Although Appling countians appear in both Company A and Company I early in the war, it appears that they transferred to Company K later on in the conflict. There is also mention of Captain John Mayers' Appling County Cavalry garrisoned in Holmesville which could have been a part of the 4th Cavalry.

Appling Countians

Name

Rank

Company

Where Enlisted

Abbot, J.H

 

A

Waynesville

Bullard, James

Pvt.

F

Camp Harris (Screven)

Carter, Paul

Pvt.

I

Doctortown

Clark, Jno.J

 

K

Waynesville

Courson, John, J.

 

I

 

Dilbon, Thomas J.

 

F

Screven

Edenfield, George

Pvt.

K

 

Faircloth, Wm.

 

I

 

Gardner, John

 

A

Waynesville

Graham, Middleton

Lt.

A & K

 

Graham, William Wallace

 

A & K

 

Gray, Issac

 

 

 

Griffis, Jacob

 

A

 

Griffis, Daniel K.

 

A & K

 

Hall, Lewis

 

K

 

Hall, Lewis B.

 

A & K

Waynesville

Hall, Henry C.

 

C

Blackshear

Herrington, Thomas

 

K

 

Hutto, William

 

E

 

Lightsey, Alfred

 

K

 

Long, D. J.

 

D(Artillery)

 

Manning, J.W.

 

K

 

Mayers, John

Capt.

 

 

McDonald, Jerry

 

 

 

Mobley, Biggers

 

 

 

Moody, John

 

K

 

Spell, Matthew

 

 

 

Stephens, Isham

Pvt.

K

 

Taylor, James M. F.

 

D (Artillery)

 

Tillman, James H.

Pvt.

K

 

Tillman, John

Pvt.

K

 

Williams, Geo. W.

 

K

 

Youmans, Perry

 

K

 

Youmans, Charles S.

 

 

 



William A. Bowers, Jr. - 1997

 

 

 

Webmaster: billybowers@atc.cc

Last Modified 10/03/2009

 

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